The power of EA lies in its ability to connect things.

As users, we get to decide what we'd like to connect to what. It might be a UML-defined link like 'Actors to Use Cases', or 'Requirements to Components'. 

What ever kind of links we create, they all mean something. And that meaning can be put into your documents, in a way that will help your readers to understand what they are seeing.

So having a list of Components in EA is interesting. So is a list of Requirements. But connecting the Requirements to the Components in a way which says which Components implement which Requirements start to make a rich web of knowledge.

So when you print the details of a Requirement, eaDocX will let you print, next to each one, the Component which satisfies the requirement:

Ref Requirement Details Implemented by Components
REQ235  All Widgets configurable The solution shall make all widgets configurable.... (CMP03) Widget Configurator
REQ481 Gadgets have Wibbles All Gadgets in the solution shall have their own Wibble  
REQ034 Admin access The Administrator shall be able to change the configuration... (CMP01) Admin Interface

So a reader of this document can start to see how their Requirements are being implemented. Apart from REQ481 - maybe there is a problem here ? We have used Conditional Formatting to highlight this.

If the reader wants to know more, they can click on the (CMP03) Widget Configurator link to find out more.

This has some useful consequences. You don't need to put all the details which the user might need into the main document. This list of Components could be in an appendix, where the inerested reader can still quickly find them. So the main document can be much smaller: just the essential information for this reader.

For more about hyperlinking, see the eaDocX Help - hyperlinking